The Art of Non-Conformity

I’ve been guzzling books lately, both fiction and non-fiction. It’s the non-fiction set that surprises me, as I’ve never really had an interest. That’s what Twitter and blogs are for. But The Art of Non-Conformity has been on my Amazon wishlist since the week it came out, and in a rash book-buying-extravaganza a couple of weeks ago, I received a copy. I just finished reading the last page. Here are my thoughts.

First, from a design perspective, the book is gorgeous. It feels good in your hands with its textured matte cover and raised print title. The branding evokes a sense of the 19th Century with its combination of serif and sans-serif, slab and the like. It just whispers, “I’m going to be a charming read. Take a chance. Pick me up.”

Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy. – Dale Carnegie

The book is peppered with inspiring quotes such as the one I pulled from page 60 of the paperback book. I’m a quote junkie, so point to Mr Guillebeau again. More importantly, this book highlights how a man who didn’t graduate high school managed to graduate with two bachelors degrees and a masters, travel the world (I believe he’s made it to over 100 countries), and start a revolution of people doing what they love and not allowing the naysayers to win.

I needed this book. I’m working full-time, and that’s great, because one of my goals once I graduated grad school was to build up my savings. I’ve almost reached my goal and I haven’t worked a full year yet. I wanted to replace my lemon of a car, Beeker, and I managed to do so without a car payment. I wanted to publish my historical fiction novel that I had put aside in order to do well in graduate school, and I did.

I needed this book to make it explicit to me that I’m already living a non-conforming life. Guillebeau gives the standard tips of not watching as much television, of not checking into social media as often, of getting out into the world and experiencing life. He emphasizes the importance of determining what it is you want out of life, because that is what will help you determine all the other decisions you have to make.

I still don’t know exactly what it is I want out of life. People tell me I have time to figure that out, but I disagree. The sooner I figure out what I want, the sooner I can start making decisions that will get me there. It’s not an end-all-be-all moment, for sure. And what I want out of life could certainly change. Which seems to be the point.

The subtitle of the book is “Set your own rules, live the life you want, and change the world.” It sounds ridiculously optimistic and naive, yet, Guillebeau’s doing it. And I, being a maker as well as a thinker, want to do the same. So thanks, Mr Guillebeau, for inspiring one more person to continue toward the long-tail goal of living the life she wants, whether it fits the norms of society or not.

  • Thanks for the great review of the book! Even reading your thoughts jump-starts me. My favorite part is the subtitle of the book – that’s poster-worthy. : )

    • Thanks, it’s a great book. I think you’d really enjoy it. The author is a huge proponent of entrepreneurial spirit and having a small business on the side turn into something that can support you, so long as you know what you need to be content.

    • Thanks, it’s a great book. I think you’d really enjoy it. The author is a huge proponent of entrepreneurial spirit and having a small business on the side turn into something that can support you, so long as you know what you need to be content.

  • That is a great quote Carnegie. Thanks for sharing Binaebi!

    • Each chapter starts with a quote that speaks to the theme of the chapter, and then within the chapter there are quotes in the margins. Good times. I think I might do a sketch in my little sketch diary that I found over the weekend.